Moley Robots Builds a Robotic Chef That Promises Complete Kitchen Automation

Robotic help has been one of our ultimate dreams of the future. As the world advances into the technological era, new inventions continue to surprise us every few months. At a time when we thought that we have everything, innovative brains continue to emanate stuff that may seem far-fetched to the average home owner. As people get busier and cooking becomes an increasing daunting task, Moley Robotics brings a robot that takes away all your concerns related to food and cooking. Kitchens are considered to be the heart of the house where food is prepared for all and it reflects the warmth of the house. Would you be able to think of your kitchen the same way if a robot starts preparing your food? Let us take a close look at Moley Robotics’ latest creation and decide for ourselves.

Design

The Robotic Kitchen is made of two robotic arms which have biomimetic humanoid hands attached to them. The hands are a creation of Shadow Robot Company. The kitchen includes a sink, stovetop and oven along with a variety of utensils which include a blender. The robot does not use a knife. The creators of this robotic chef feel that the world may not be ready yet for a robot that can yield a knife.

How it works

In order to cook a particular food, the robot uses a database which is executed by a computer that uses Robotic Operating System which is a platform that works on Linux. There is no artificial intelligence being used by this robot, which means it does not learn over time. It simply mimics the actions that were previously performed by a chef to cook that meal. This renders the robot to be comparatively dumb.

The movements that the Robot performs for creating a crab bisque have been performed by Tim Anderson who was the winner of MasterChef, 2011. Anderson had to make the bisque five times as engineers recorded him at a rate of 100 Hz and used the best actions from every recording to create the database for the robot.

This shows that the robot is not really capable of performing any reasoning or logical moves itself. It simply replicates whatever was done before by Anderson. The fact that it is recreating Anderson’s moves means that if anything was not placed in the correct position, the robot will end up messing the dish.

The robot cannot establish for itself if the ingredients it is using are right or not, so if you placed the ingredients in the wrong order, then you may end up eating a dish that does not taste the same. Even a slightly misplaced saucepan handle can turn disastrous for the dish because the robot will simply grab in thin air.

Unveiling

The robot was unveiled at Hanover Messe – a trade fair in Germany which promotes industrial technology. The robot also made heads turn at the Consumer Electronics Fair in Shanghai. The Moley Robotics team were questioned ceaselessly on the abilities of the robot and tech savvy customers were ready to pay humongous amounts for the chic robot which deftly created a crab bisque as people watched with their mouths agape.

Commercialization

Unfortunately, Moley Robotics is not putting it in the market yet. The robot is only a prototype and the final model is yet to be prepared so that it can be made available commercially. Moley Robots is based in Islington, North London and the startup has won accolades already for the creation of this robotic kitchen.

The company plans to make the consumer version of the robot available at $75,000. It should be in the market by 2018. Company forecasts suggest that it will be able to sell 1,000 units to early clients. It is in talks with business organizations and builders who may want to use the robot in their companies or homes.

Conclusion

The robot kitchen is in its nascent stage but the ability of the robot to mimic Anderson’s minutest details is outstanding. The slight dance of Anderson’s fingers, the way the robot copies his actions as he holds the food processor to keep it stable and the way the robot does the plating is mesmerizing. We may not be able to bring it to our homes right now, but the future of this robot from Moley Robotics looks promising.

 

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